Art history straddles the digital divide. Its pedagogical practices have been transformed by digital technology, but its scholarship remains wedded to the printed age. … Art history is invested in the monographic book as the prime vehicle for transmission of knowledge and academic advancement, and this bias is reinforced by tenure and promotion standards that privilege books over other types of publications.

-

Hilary Ballon and Mariet Westermann. “Art History and Its Publications in the Electronic Age.” Rice University Press (2006). 

There are only a couple open access, online art history journals, but they are limited in scope. ArtHistory.us aims to add to their numbers.  Our field can move past print publication bias, and slowly but surely, it will.

Be a force of change by submitting an article to ArtHistory.us. Let’s create a new kind of journal for an emerging type of art history.

(via caravaggista)

(via caravaggista)

nprbooks:

This awesome librarian quote was brought to you by NPR’s Laura Sullivan, who interviewed Dimunation about the library’s efforts to reassemble the original book collection Jefferson sold Congress in 1815. Listen to the story here.
[Ed note: Now without the typo!]

nprbooks:

This awesome librarian quote was brought to you by NPR’s Laura Sullivan, who interviewed Dimunation about the library’s efforts to reassemble the original book collection Jefferson sold Congress in 1815. Listen to the story here.

[Ed note: Now without the typo!]

thegetty:

Winter is coming. All men must die. And Game of Thrones is back!

Hope you’ve enjoyed this series. Catch up on all the episodes here.

Best. Game of Thrones.Season. Finale. Our final medieval art recap features a range of manuscripts, from devotional texts to history and chronicle. We once again find interesting pairings between a mysterious hermit in a cave and a man seated lofty in a tree surrounded by birds; or a man and a woman beating each other and spice merchants setting sail; or a suggestive juxtaposition of adulterous lovers and a man preparing an arrow in a bow. We were as frightened by armed and as a group of wealthy boys were in a popular medieval legend of “The Three Living and the Three Dead.”

In war, while some negotiate terms, others are forced to surrender. Saddest moment: when the Mother of Dragons was forced to tame her winged, fire-breathing children. True medieval moment: examining the bloody content of a side wound. Cannot wait for the next season!

archivesfoundation:

Registration is now open for the next #ArchivesSleepover! Join us for “History, Heroes, and Treasures: Explorers Night” on August 2 at the National Archives Museum in Washington, DC. Campers will journey to the Arctic, visit Outer Space, and discover the American West as they explore the National Archives Museum’s treasured records, before turning in to sleep in the Rotunda for the Charters of Freedom, next to the Declaration of Independence, the US Constitution, and the Bill of Rights. For more information or to register, go to archivesfoundation.org/sleepover

Ooooohhhh. I’d love to go. 

archivesfoundation:

Registration is now open for the next #ArchivesSleepover! Join us for “History, Heroes, and Treasures: Explorers Night” on August 2 at the National Archives Museum in Washington, DC.

Campers will journey to the Arctic, visit Outer Space, and discover the American West as they explore the National Archives Museum’s treasured records, before turning in to sleep in the Rotunda for the Charters of Freedom, next to the Declaration of Independence, the US Constitution, and the Bill of Rights.

For more information or to register, go to archivesfoundation.org/sleepover

Ooooohhhh. I’d love to go. 

thegetty:

Even paintings sometimes need the day off. Van Gogh’s Irises taking a day trip to the conservation studios for study.

thegetty:

Even paintings sometimes need the day off. Van Gogh’s Irises taking a day trip to the conservation studios for study.

(via installator)

smithsonian:

Calling all technologists: Would you like to help us prototype some interesting, open-source solutions with our data? 
Three of our museums are making their public collections data available this weekend for National Day of Civil Hacking, a nationwide hackathon with thousands of participants and hundreds of events. 
We’re eager to see what you can do with our stuff! 

smithsonian:

Calling all technologists: Would you like to help us prototype some interesting, open-source solutions with our data? 

Three of our museums are making their public collections data available this weekend for National Day of Civil Hacking, a nationwide hackathon with thousands of participants and hundreds of events. 

We’re eager to see what you can do with our stuff! 

dilemmabovary:

every one should always talk about art even if they don’t think they know a lot about art.

I love watching people talk about the art they love, especially if they don’t have formal vocabulary for it.

(via caravaggista)

smithsoniantranscriptioncenter:

smithsoniantranscriptioncenter:

Join us for a LIVE Google+ Hangout on Air tomorrow TODAY, May 29 at 4:30 - 5:00 pm EDT - we’ll discuss your biggest Qs about Transcription and Reviewing before we kick off next week’s #7DayReviewChallenge
What you need to know: There are 10 “seats” in the Google+ Hangout but everyone/anyone can watch the YouTube livestream. During the discussion, you can tweet your questions and write them in the comments of the YouTube page - I will do my best to field them as we go and summarize after.
We can make the process run smoothly if we share questions ahead of time. Please e-mail, post on this FB wall, or tweet and try to provide:- explanation of the issue,- example project and page number,- suggestion of solution to the issueSee you tomorrow! IN A FEW HOURS
Questions about your devices? Find technical details here

More details: 
Streaming Hangout on Air - YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCwnTgRJfViJY7QUBOzAxH3w
Our Twitter feed and Facebook page, at which you can see updates:
Twitter: https://twitter.com/TranscribeSI
Facebook: http://facebook.com/SmithsonianTranscriptionCenter
Let’s use the hashtag: #volunpeers

smithsoniantranscriptioncenter:

smithsoniantranscriptioncenter:

Join us for a LIVE Google+ Hangout on Air tomorrow TODAY, May 29 at 4:30 - 5:00 pm EDT - we’ll discuss your biggest Qs about Transcription and Reviewing before we kick off next week’s #7DayReviewChallenge

What you need to know: There are 10 “seats” in the Google+ Hangout but everyone/anyone can watch the YouTube livestream. During the discussion, you can tweet your questions and write them in the comments of the YouTube page - I will do my best to field them as we go and summarize after.

We can make the process run smoothly if we share questions ahead of time. Please e-mail, post on this FB wall, or tweet and try to provide:
- explanation of the issue,
- example project and page number,
- suggestion of solution to the issue

See you tomorrow! IN A FEW HOURS

Questions about your devices? Find technical details here

More details: 

Streaming Hangout on Air - YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCwnTgRJfViJY7QUBOzAxH3w

Our Twitter feed and Facebook page, at which you can see updates:

Twitter: https://twitter.com/TranscribeSI

Facebook: http://facebook.com/SmithsonianTranscriptionCenter

Let’s use the hashtag: #volunpeers

blantonmuseum:

We’re just going to come out and say it: cats make everything better. We’re loving these works by Russian artist Svetlana Petrova.

(PS - if you’re in Austin, you won’t want to miss our summer exhibition, In the Company of Cats and Dogs, opening in June!)

Absolutely charming! 

Thank You

medievalpoc:

Dear Readers: I’ve spoken briefly on my changed personal and financial circumstances this year, and I’ve decided that in order to keep this project sustainable for me, and accessible for everyone, I am in the process of creating a Patreon account to help deal with database costs, hosting fees, and time expenditure while dealing with my circumstances. Unfortunately, this takes time to set up.

In the meantime, I must ask you if you are willing, please consider donating a convenient amount to the sustaining of this blog, as my electricity is set to be turned off tomorrow unless I can come up with half of the total balance. My phone is also set to be turned off within a week due to past due amounts. Even a dollar will help, even a reblog will help. I have already exhausted my resources, and I’m at a loss.

No matter what, the information and images amassed here and at the medievalpoc.org site will remain free to everyone as they have always been. It’s my hope that I can continue to curate the content here, because this is what I truly love to do.

Whether you come for the art, the history, to ask questions, read the essays, or just to say hi, I continue to be humbled and grateful for your readership.

Here’s the donation link again, and there is also a link on the main page of this blog. My thanks to everyone, regardless of ability to donate.

Having asked for donations before, and then later spoken to an intellectual property lawyer, I strongly caution you: Your information is not free, and not your own. You do not have any intellectual property rights to anything not in the common domain. 

The blog information you have is already either free and accessible through the museums you took the information from, or through subscribed academic databases and are under copyright. 

I think you need to be careful because the costs you’re asking for are just for your personal expenses and not the maintenance of a free tumblr blog with information from public resources.